Rank Name CPURAMSpaceBandwidthPrice Rating Info
VEXXHOST41024 MB40 GB100 GB$31.90Review

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SingleHop11024 MB25 GB3 TB$50.00Review

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NetDepot11 GB30 GB2 TB$43.00Review

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Atlantic.Net11024 MB80 GB30 Mbps$43.80Review

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NetHosting.com11024 MB40 GB250 GB$79.95Review

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Eleven2.com0.251024 MB60 GB500 GB$25.00Review

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VEXXHOST

Price:
$31.90
CPU:
4
Space:
40 GB
RAM:
1024 MB
Bandwidth:
100 GB
Ratings
Overall
Features
Price
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Average
Info
Price $31.90
CPU 4
Space 40 GB
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 100 GB

Overview 
VEXXHOST cloud hosting company is very well known company in the field of cloud hosting services. This company was established in year 2006 and now it possesses a great experience of more than six years in this service. They are headquartered in St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada. They have also an office in United States, which is located at New York City. They have achieved the image of the most reliable and most economical service provider in very short span of time. The prices and services of this company are matchless, which is clearly depicted from customer reviews and awards from independent professional organizations. Continue reading “VEXXHOST” »

1 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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1 Review

SingleHop

Price:
$50.00
CPU:
1
RAM:
1024 MB
Bandwidth:
3 TB
Space:
25 GB
Ratings
Overall
Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average
Info
Price $50.00
CPU 1
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 3 TB
Space 25 GB

Overview 
Singly hop cloud hosting company is one of the best companies in this domain of business. This company was established in year 2006 by two founding members Mr. Zak Boca and Dan Ushman. Its headquarters are situated in Chicago area. It has state of the art data centers in Chicago area; they are highly managed and well equipped in all respect. Single Hop Cloud hosting Company has achieved many milestones during last about six years of operation. It has achieved the recognition of being one of the reliable cloud partners of the all types of entrepreneurs. It is it number one fasted growing IT company and 25th in overall growing company in United States of America. Continue reading “SingleHop” »

0 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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NetDepot

Price:
$43.00
CPU:
1
Space:
30 GB
RAM:
1 GB
Bandwidth:
2 TB
Ratings
Overall
Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average
Info
Price $43.00
CPU 1
Space 30 GB
RAM 1 GB
Bandwidth 2 TB

Overview 
Net depot cloud hosting company is a leading small and large enterprises services provider company. It is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia in United States. This company was established about 17 years back in 1994, since then, it has gained a vast technical expertise and experience in the field of cloud hosting solutions. It has also one state of the art data center at Dallas, Texas. Continue reading “NetDepot” »

0 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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Atlantic.Net

Price:
$43.80
CPU:
1
RAM:
1024 MB
Bandwidth:
30 Mbps
Space:
80 GB
Ratings
Overall
Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average
Info
Price $43.80
CPU 1
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 30 Mbps
Space 80 GB

Overview
Atlantic Cloud Hosting Company was established in year 1994 to provide the cloud hosting service to its customers. Since then, it has transformed itself into a market leading company in the field of cloud hosting. It provides not only the cloud hosting services but a complete solution to cloud hosting problems of a customer. It headquarters are located in Orland, Florida, United States of America. It has many other offices nationwide too. It is one of the best clouds hosting solution provider companies in USA. Continue reading “Atlantic.Net” »

0 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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NetHosting.com

Price:
$79.95
RAM:
1024 MB
Space:
40 GB
Bandwidth:
250 GB
CPU:
1
Ratings
Overall
Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average
Info
Price $79.95
RAM 1024 MB
Space 40 GB
Bandwidth 250 GB
CPU 1

Overview 
Net Hosting is cloud hosting company, which is providing many services to its valuable customers. It is located in North America with headquarter in Orem, Utah, United States of America. This company was established in year 1998. Net Hosting Company was established by Lane Livingston. This company offers many other services other than cloud hosting services too. Continue reading “NetHosting.com” »

0 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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Eleven2.com

Price:
$25.00
RAM:
1024 MB
Space:
60 GB
Bandwidth:
500 GB
CPU:
0.25
Ratings
Overall
Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average
Info
Price $25.00
RAM 1024 MB
Space 60 GB
Bandwidth 500 GB
CPU 0.25

Overview
Eleven 2 is a very well known and fast growing cloud hosting company. It was founded by Rodney in year 2003. He is a technical expert entrepreneur who established this cloud hosting company, whose headquarter is located at Houston, Texas, United States of America. This company has multiple plans and business scenarios for its customers and cloud hosting plans are among such exciting business plans of this company. It provides some unmatched cloud hosting plans in the market place. Continue reading “Eleven2.com” »

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Google launches Cloud IoT Core service for enterprises

Google today unveiled a cloud platform service to help organizations collect vital data from billions of Internet of Things devices.

The service, Google Cloud IoT Core, is designed to help enterprises, including utilities and transportation agencies, securely connect globally distributed devices to the Google Cloud Platform. There, the data can be centrally managed and integrated with Google’s data analytics services, said Indranil Chakraborty, cloud product manager at Google.

One customer who has been testing the new service for two months is Energyworx, a company of 40 workers that has used Google cloud services since 2014. Energyworx provides data analytics to utilities to help them plan better and improve performance.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IBM makes leap in quantum computing power

IBM has some new options for businesses wanting to experiment with quantum computing.

Quantum computers, when they become commercially available, are expected to vastly outperform conventional computers in a number of domains, including machine learning, cryptography and the optimization of business problems in the fields of logistics and risk analysis.

Where conventional computers deal in ones and zeros (bits) the processors in quantum computers use qubits, which can simultaneously hold the values one and zero. This — to grossly oversimplify — allows a quantum computer with a 5-qubit processor to perform a calculation for 32 different input values at the same time.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: When it comes to cloud, one size does not fit all

While the cloud market is very competitive, enterprises are making it clear that when it comes to cloud, one size does not fit all. They can’t build their businesses by just relying on infrastructure-as-a-serve (IaaS) and committing to one vendor.

These sentiments were echoed by Mary Meeker’s annual internet trends report, which found that companies are increasingly concerned about being locked-in with one cloud vendor. Citing data from Bain and Morgan Stanley, it was found that in 2015, 22 percent of organizations surveyed said they had concerns about using only one cloud vendor, compared with only seven percent in 2012.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

6 trends shaping IT cloud strategies today

Cloud computing has helped many enterprises transform their IT practices over the past five years, but experts agree that the market is entering a second wave for public, private and hybrid cloud services.

According to a Forrester Research survey, 38 percent of enterprise decision-makers said they are building private clouds, with 32 percent procuring public cloud services and the remainder planning to implement some form of cloud technology this year. The hybrid cloud is also heating up, with 59 percent of respondents saying they are adopting the model. Fueling this accelerating adoption is the need for enterprises to scale their compute resources to better serve customers, Forrester Research Dave Bartoletti tells CIO.com.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Data migrations without the migraines

Whether or not you work in the IT department, you have likely experienced the pain of migrating from one system to another. When you buy a new laptop, or a new phone, you’re faced with having to backup and replicate your old data to your new system, or start from scratch with none of the files you might need on your new device.

Imagine this problem at enterprise scale. Moving terabytes of data is a daunting task that also requires planning and downtime when IT has to add a new storage system,  upgrade or replacement. Just like with our smartphones, the old system likely still has some value, but since data can’t move easily from one system to the other, the equipment we’re leaving behind often remains as a backup to the backup copy.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud

3 killer cloud skills that will get you hired today

One of the most common questions that I’m asked is: “What cloud skills do I need that will get me hired quickly?”

First, keep in mind that this is an emerging area, so what employers are looking for is constantly shifting. Second, even if they do hire you for a specific skill, you’ll be asked to retrain and retool as the cloud technology matures.

Still, here are three skills that should get you hired right now:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The 2 cloud security myths that must die

There seem to be two groups of people out there when it comes to cloud security: There are those who believe that public clouds are systemically unsafe, and those who believe clouds are impenetrable.

They’re both wrong. Both of these myths are dangerous, and so they need to die.

Kill this myth: If my data is in a public cloud, it’s inherently unsafe

The thinking goes like this: Because I can’t see it or touch it, others can steal it.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Forget the GUI: The return of the command line

If you immerse yourself in Microsoft history for long enough, you’ll come across more than one story about staff trying to add more command-line features to its operating systems. The plans go up the corporate tree, to the rarified heights of a Bill Gates review, where the executives ask, “What part of the name Windows do you have a problem with?”

Corporate legends aside, Windows on both the desktop and server have long been the province of GUIs, point-and-click experiences driving everything from files on desktop PCs to managing entire virtual networks in the public cloud. That was all very well when you were dealing with tens of PCs and a handful of servers in an office. It even still worked for client-server enterprise applications or a small farm of web servers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Digital Ecosystems: Do Not Do It Alone!

As software becomes an increasingly large part of an enterprise’s external expression, traditional physical ecosystems—such as suppliers, resellers, and retailers—need to be supplemented, and in some cases supplanted, by new software ecosystems.

Consider Walgreens, a customer of my employer, Google. To interact with customers, Walgreens doesn’t merely operate physical stores and provide first-party apps and websites. On the contrary, it also expresses core services—such as filling prescriptions or ordering photo prints—as APIs. This enables developers and partners to easily integrate Walgreens services into their own products, which in turn enables Walgreens to extend its brand presence into ecosystems it neither owns nor had to build.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: An under-pressure OpenStack gets support from an (in)famous individual

Last week saw a few thousand devoted OpenStack community members flock to Boston to take part in the bi-annual OpenStack Summit. This summit marks a major turning point for the initiative. Since we all congregated in Barcelona last year, there have been some major pieces of news which have rocked the community. Only a couple of weeks before the event, Intel pulled out of a partnership with Rackspace to build an OpenStack-based test facility, and OpenStack poster boy Mirantis pivoted from a pure OpenStack strategy to one covering a number of open source initiatives.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: When does tech make you money and when does it cost you?

There’s an interesting Forbes article on the topic of turning a cost center into a profit center. In it, author Larry Myler talks about three ways to “become a hero” by:

  1. Killing overhead,
  2. Inventing revenue, and
  3. Supporting company strategy.

Having worked in cost centers within organizations myself, I was skeptical as to whether this can actually be done. If so, it would change the game for just about any company trying to reduce costs and increase revenues (and that would be almost every organization).

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Twilio does speech recognition and understanding, the right way

We’ve all had horrendous experiences with voice recognition when calling a support center – I’d like to think that it’s just me with my slightly unusual Kiwi accent, but everyone I talk to has similar stories of getting exasperated at an automated call center that hopelessly gets even the most basic speech recognition exercises wrong. It’s a sad reality of the modern world that organizations try to shoehorn users into solutions that aren’t yet fit for purpose, just to save some costs.

The world of communications has been the focus of Jeff Lawson for the past few years. Lawson is founder and CEO of Twilio, the company that offers a modular communications platform that developers use to power the communication functions of their apps. From tiny startups to huge companies like Uber rely on Twilio to manage all the communication stuff, so that they don’t have to. in a phone conversation prior to Twilio’s annual developer conference, Signal, Lawson told me that ever since the beginnings of Twilio, back when all they did was voice communications, he has hated voice recognition.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

How serverless changes application development

Serverless software architectures have generated a lot of interest. How much interest? Like, 2000 people at a conference breakout session —that level of interest. The photo below shows Datadog devops evangelist Matt Williams delivering a session about Lambda at AWS re:Invent last December. The jam-packed venue was originally designed to house “Phantom of the Opera.”

datadog awsreinvent2016 Hyun Auh

I’ve been going to tech conferences for 25 years, and I have never been to a breakout that required a mezzanine before. Serverless is catching like wildfire.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Why you should use microservices

So you’re sitting on hundreds of thousands of lines of legacy C++. Oh, who are we trying to kid? It’s millions of lines of Vectran, a short-lived Fortran variant created by IBM in the ’70s. But hey, if it ain’t broke, right?

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

(Insider Story)
InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Serverless computing: Don’t make the wrong choices

Serverless computing is all the rage right now—and for several good reasons:

  • It removes you from having to provision a server yourself; you simply write functions, and the resources you need are automatically allocated to that function.
  • You pay only for the resources you use. No more leaving servers up and running, then getting a big cloud bill at the end of the month.
  • It can automatically scale, determining what cloud services need to scale with demand and then making it happen.

Amazon Web Services’ AWS Lambda and Microsoft’s Azure Functions are the best-known examples of serverless computing, and both have existed for a few years. Still, although we’ve had some great success in some serverless areas, there are other serverless areas that need work.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Data Center Automation and the Software-Defined Database

If you take a step back for a moment and think about airplane flight, it turns out that something rather extraordinary is happening. Most of the time the plane is being flown by an autopilot and the pilot is actually kind of a “meta pilot” – a minder that watches to ensure that the autopilot is not doing anything dumb. And every year, millions of us entrust our lives to this system – we’re not only okay with it, we’re in fact impressed that an auto-pilot can do that stuff so effectively. Against that backdrop, now consider how extraordinary it is that we don’t have computer software that can “fly” a data-center. Don’t bet that it will stay that way. It is changing, and the changes are going to have big consequences.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

OneLogin hack exposed sensitive US customer data and ability to decrypt data

OneLogin, an identity management company which provides a single sign-on platform for logging into multiple apps and sites, was hacked. US customer data was potentially compromised,“including the ability to decrypt encrypted data.”

The company, which claims “over 2000+ enterprise customers in 44 countries across the globe trust OneLogin,” announced the security incident on May 31. It was short on details, primarily saying the unauthorized access it detected had been blocked and law enforcement was notified.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud

Cloud helps Elon Musk further his audacious goals

There are some people whose vision of the future simply defy words. I would put Elon Musk firmly in the category – changing the world through a single initiative isn’t Musk’s style, rather, he wants to deliver his vision of the future across multiple areas. Space travel? Check. Hyper-efficient terrestrial transportation? Also check. Personal automobiles that challenge both existing business and technology models? Check. Solar power with new economics and scale? Also check. While many would question his political leanings, there is no denying that Musk is a genius.

I’ve never met Musk, but watching him speak it is obvious that this is one visionary who not only sees a “bigger picture” for the future of humanity, but he also deeply understands the technology constraints and opportunities that will deliver the future. Which is an inspiring thing to watch, but which also places huge challenges upon the individuals who need to deliver that work. By extension, it also pushes the boundaries of what existing technologies can do.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud

Healthcare CIO advocates a faster move to the cloud

With more than 35 years of health IT experience, UC Irvine Health CIO Chuck Podesta has witnessed the dramatic evolution of IT as well as the impact that technology has had in transforming medical operations and patient care.

That said, Podesta believes the healthcare industry still lags in certain areas, particularly in its adoption of cloud computing and its efforts to develop effective, efficient partnerships with vendors. As a frequent speaker at national conferences, Podesta offers strategies to bring health IT to its next level while at the same time developing strategies that advance the effectiveness of his own organization’s technology. Here, he shares some of his insights and ideas:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Making a business case for Alexa

I have been fascinated with the idea of a personal voice assistant since the day Amazon made their Echo devices available. Once in awhile I come back to it, try to write another skill, see what is new. I published a couple of articles on the topic. I struggle to find a good use case for a business application. A lot of it has to do with technical limitations.

On February 23, 2017, Amazon published a blog post celebrating over 10,000 skills. The good news is that this is a three-fold increase since September of 2016. The bad news is that the majority of the skills are solutions in search of problems.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Review: Office 365’s Delve, Sway and Planner fall flat

Microsoft really, really wants to own all of your office work, so it keeps finding new tools it hopes you will add to your Office 365 portfolio. (All require an Office 365 account to use.) The latest is today’s announcement that its Microsoft Planner mobile app is now available for iPhone and Android phones. Microsoft said on its Office Blog  that current Planner users can use this companion app to view and update their plans on the go. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

(Insider Story)
Computerworld Cloud Computing

The 3 dumbest things enterprises do in the cloud

You’re going to make mistakes. I tell my enterprise clients that every week.

However, there are mistakes and there are mistakes that are more like self-inflected wounds. Here are three of the dumbest mistakes I’m now seeing enterprises make in the cloud efforts.

Dumbest mistake No. 1: Keeping the data on premises but the compute in the cloud

When helping clients plan their cloud efforts, I regularly hear, “My data is sacred, so we don’t want to put our data in the cloud. However, we’re paying too much for compute and datacenter space, so let’s place that on some public cloud.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: VDI deserves another look based on Dell EMC VDI Complete

Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) is well known to be a vastly underutilized technology in enterprise. A large majority of the market has long been aware of the potential benefits but has been waiting on the technology to mature. The new Dell EMC VDI Complete offering announced recently at Dell EMC World 2017 was a big reminder of how far this technology has most recently progressed and why it is time for a revisit.

Dell EMC’s VDI Complete offering takes a unique step beyond past VDI solution bundles by combining all of the hardware infrastructure and the software stack into a fully validated offering that is priced, delivered, and supported by a single vendor. This consolidated offer structure also enables them to offer a monthly cost per user consumption model in addition to an upfront prepay model. With this introduction, they have tackled each of the top remaining complexities to delivering VDI solutions, namely cost predictability, deployment, and support.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Cloud Power, Fear of Lock-in Grows Among IT Managers

Mary Meeker’s Global Internet Trends: As the digital age expands, so does fear of technology lock-in by cloud vendors.
InformationWeek: Cloud

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