Rank Name CPURAMSpaceBandwidthPrice Rating Info
VEXXHOST41024 MB40 GB100 GB$31.90Review

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SingleHop11024 MB25 GB3 TB$50.00Review

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NetDepot11 GB30 GB2 TB$43.00Review

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Atlantic.Net11024 MB80 GB30 Mbps$43.80Review

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NetHosting.com11024 MB40 GB250 GB$79.95Review

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Eleven2.com0.251024 MB60 GB500 GB$25.00Review

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VEXXHOST

Info
Price $31.90
CPU 4
Space 40 GB
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 100 GB

Overview 
VEXXHOST cloud hosting company is very well known company in the field of cloud hosting services. This company was established in year 2006 and now it possesses a great experience of more than six years in this service. They are headquartered in St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada. They have also an office in United States, which is located at New York City. They have achieved the image of the most reliable and most economical service provider in very short span of time. The prices and services of this company are matchless, which is clearly depicted from customer reviews and awards from independent professional organizations. Continue reading “VEXXHOST” »

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SingleHop

Info
Price $50.00
CPU 1
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 3 TB
Space 25 GB

Overview 
Singly hop cloud hosting company is one of the best companies in this domain of business. This company was established in year 2006 by two founding members Mr. Zak Boca and Dan Ushman. Its headquarters are situated in Chicago area. It has state of the art data centers in Chicago area; they are highly managed and well equipped in all respect. Single Hop Cloud hosting Company has achieved many milestones during last about six years of operation. It has achieved the recognition of being one of the reliable cloud partners of the all types of entrepreneurs. It is it number one fasted growing IT company and 25th in overall growing company in United States of America. Continue reading “SingleHop” »

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NetDepot

Info
Price $43.00
CPU 1
Space 30 GB
RAM 1 GB
Bandwidth 2 TB

Overview 
Net depot cloud hosting company is a leading small and large enterprises services provider company. It is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia in United States. This company was established about 17 years back in 1994, since then, it has gained a vast technical expertise and experience in the field of cloud hosting solutions. It has also one state of the art data center at Dallas, Texas. Continue reading “NetDepot” »

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Atlantic.Net

Info
Price $43.80
CPU 1
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 30 Mbps
Space 80 GB

Overview
Atlantic Cloud Hosting Company was established in year 1994 to provide the cloud hosting service to its customers. Since then, it has transformed itself into a market leading company in the field of cloud hosting. It provides not only the cloud hosting services but a complete solution to cloud hosting problems of a customer. It headquarters are located in Orland, Florida, United States of America. It has many other offices nationwide too. It is one of the best clouds hosting solution provider companies in USA. Continue reading “Atlantic.Net” »

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NetHosting.com

Info
Price $79.95
RAM 1024 MB
Space 40 GB
Bandwidth 250 GB
CPU 1

Overview 
Net Hosting is cloud hosting company, which is providing many services to its valuable customers. It is located in North America with headquarter in Orem, Utah, United States of America. This company was established in year 1998. Net Hosting Company was established by Lane Livingston. This company offers many other services other than cloud hosting services too. Continue reading “NetHosting.com” »

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Eleven2.com

Info
Price $25.00
RAM 1024 MB
Space 60 GB
Bandwidth 500 GB
CPU 0.25

Overview
Eleven 2 is a very well known and fast growing cloud hosting company. It was founded by Rodney in year 2003. He is a technical expert entrepreneur who established this cloud hosting company, whose headquarter is located at Houston, Texas, United States of America. This company has multiple plans and business scenarios for its customers and cloud hosting plans are among such exciting business plans of this company. It provides some unmatched cloud hosting plans in the market place. Continue reading “Eleven2.com” »

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Microsoft researcher: Why Micro Datacenters really matter to mobile’s future

Microsoft Research distinguished scientist Victor Bahl has been spreading the word about Micro Datacenters, also known by the adorable name “cloudlets,” as a key concept for optimizing the performance and usefulness of mobile and other networked devices via the cloud. Service providers have embraced this vision most strongly from the start, but it won’t be long before enterprise IT pros will likely do the same, Bahl says.

Here’s a more in-depth look at the What, Why and When of mDCs:

victor bahl bio Microsoft

I notice that a lot of the research you’re involved in includes not just mobility, but the cloud. Are the two inextricably linked going forward?

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Quarterly numbers lend credence to Whitman’s plan for HP breakup

Originally published on Gigaom Research

HP has announced its final quarterly results prior to the break up into Hewlett Packard Enterprise — which will be led by current CEO Meg Whitman — and HP Inc. — to be headed up by Dion Weisler. The numbers suggest that Meg Whitman may be getting the bigger half of the wishbone with Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and also lend support to the basic idea of splitting the company in half.

Of course the new HPE needs a new look, logo, and narrative:

HPE_Social_Media_Reveal_1200x600_B3

Meg Whitman made an observation about the new logo back in April:

Maybe you noticed it, but take a look at the name “Hewlett” in the new design.  This is the first time in our history that the two t’s in Hewlett connect. That connection is symbolic of the partnership we will forge with our customers, partners, and our employees – what we will do together to help drive your business forward.

Ok, I am willing to take that with a grain of salt. We’ll have to see what actually comes from the new HPE, but the numbers tell us something.

First of all, HP’s net income dropped to $ 900 million, or 47 cents a share, down from $ 1 billion, or 52 cents a share from the previous year.  But they beat expectations on profit slightly — after restructuring and acquisition charges were excluded — leading to the share price rising in after hours trading. Wall Street seems happy, so far.

And the best news, or perhaps the only good news, is the 2 percent increase in revenue for the HP enterprise group — the soon to be Hewlett Packard Enterprise — reflecting market uptake of the company’s servers, storage, and networking products.

The negative buzz at the earnings call is all about the other end of the soon-to-be-broken-apart HP: the printer and PC business of HP Inc. Or perhaps we can call it Red Inc. PC sales were down 13 percent, and the printer business is down by 9 percent.

I can’t find a post with a logo for the new HP Inc., but in a recent interview Weisler seemed to be saying that he’s bullish about 3D printing as a future for HP Inc., although he veers between wonky details and historical analogies so much it’s hard to tell:

Weisler: If we go way back in time, you had a blacksmith who would make a unique horseshoe for your horse, as an example.  That would be the manufacturing process. With the industrial revolution, the assembly line was created, and over the years we got better at pressing the supply chain, and making that assembly line more efficient. Manufacturing was still in the hands of a few. The internet comes along, and we can collapse and make that supply chain even more efficient and close it. It still was not really a dramatic change. With 3-D printing, you actually get to democratize manufacturing again because anybody can do it.

Now, where does that start? In our view, the greatest amount of value actually starts in the commercial marketplace. Ultimately as these technologies mature, it will make its way into the consumer realm, as well. Some have another strategy to grow from consumer up. I think the reason it has not taken off either in consumer or commercial, is as an industry we have not solved the problem of speed, quality, and cost. If you really want to be instructive to traditional manufacturing processes, you have to have it operate at the right speed, you have to have the right kind of quality, and you have to have an economic model that makes sense. So with multi-jet fusion, we believe we have made a really big breakthrough here.

Those who actually understand the industry well, and understand what we have done, recognize that we are printing copy ten times faster than the fastest printer on the market today.  We can do it with minute accuracy down to 21 microns–  about a tenth of a size of a human hair.  We can do very intricate parts that still have really strong mechanical properties.  Then because of the technique we use to print the part – we do it on a big flat bed – we can do highly economical parts that begin to make a difference. I think initially it will lend itself more towards commercial markets in the near-term.

I admit, I got lost in there. But I do believe that there is an enormous opportunity in 3D printing, and HP Inc. is well-positioned to attack that.

But I think that Meg Whitman has cleared her decks for the upcoming battle for enterprise infrastructure, and handed off her worst headaches to Dion Weisler. It’s looking like a better idea all the time.

Quarterly numbers lend credence to Whitman’s plan for HP breakup originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

IBM Lays Industry Specific Powerful Behavior Based Predictive Analytics

predictive analytics predictive models 300x183 IBM Lays Industry Specific Powerful Behavior Based Predictive Analytics

Image source IBM

The challenge for organizations is to capture, manage and make sense of their data in real time so that many employees can make better decisions faster. In the course of time, predictive analytics evolve and becomes accessible to all enterprise users, regardless of their industry.

IBM is trying to position the company as the leader in predictive analysis and announced a new set of 20 new predictive analytic solutions unique to each industry. Using the new IBM applications, companies can get quick answers to questions such as how many different color combinations fabrics should we continue to sell in our stores? People who spend time at the table after 20:00 are they more likely to be exposed or late to repay their bank loans? When should we stop the production of an oil well to pump maintenance?

The new generation of IBM solutions can be applied to several sectors – banking, telecommunications, insurance, automotive, energy and other sectors. At the heart of these solutions is a set of data preparation tools for the integration of specific data sources for industry such as pre-built models and predictive analysis of its own, and tables interactive and specific board to help business users to share findings between teams and organizations.

IBM says, “the new solutions draw on company’s vast industry and analytics expertise from over 50,000 client engagements. Each solution includes pre-built predictive analytic modeling patterns and interfaces for focused industry use cases, as well as data preparation capabilities to manage unique data and streamline the collection and preparation of data for analytics. With interactive and role-specific dashboards, business users can share predictive insights across teams and organizations that can give them a deeper understanding of their customers, assets and operations to help them make better decisions and act with greater speed and fewer resources.”

In the area of Banking, the AML Monitoring and Analytics for Financial Services, the Multi-Channel Fraud Analytics and Behavior-based Customer Insight operate, respectively, in terms of mitigating money laundering risks, prevention of financial fraud and customization customer experience.

The Asset Analytics for Rotational Equipment is designed by IBM solutions for the chemical and oil industry and uses the predictive analysis to anticipate operational breaks and enhance the reliability and availability of critical equipment.

In the financial segment, Regulatory Compliance and Control and Trade Compliance Analytics enable better risk management and regulatory compliance and comprehensive view of the market, using analytical capacity.

In the area of consumer products, the technology company has created a solution that you want to study the customers’ consumption behavior and their reactions to certain marketing strategies. The Social Merchandising allows enhancing the operational efficiency of companies that wish to reach a particular group of consumers.

In the sphere of insurance, the IBM Analytics Solution Insurance gives a greater customer experience and reduce the dropout rate, the Producer Life Cycle and Credential Management help insurers automate processes, and the Property & Casualty Claims Fraud enables a more efficient identification and needs of fraud incidents.

For the media and entertainment area players, IBM developed the Behavior-based Audience Insight to a better understanding of their audiences and more efficiently create advertising and marketing campaigns and new content.

In April, following in the footsteps of its closest competitor Microsoft, Amazon announced the Amazon Machine Learning, a fully managed cloud service designed to draw useful information from mountains of data that it is sometimes difficult to exploit, for reasons of complexity, time or energy.


CloudTimes

ZeroStack hatches plans for no-hassle, cloud-managed OpenStack

If there’s one part of the OpenStack market that never stops yielding enterprising newcomers, it’s the market for solutions to simplify OpenStack implementations. Not only could OpenStack still use help there, but such an approach nearly guarantees a revenue stream.

Newest to this table is ZeroStack, a freshly decloaked startup from VMware and AMD alumni, with a novel approach to OpenStack management for smaller and midtier outfits.

Your OpenStack is their business

ZeroStack’s idea is a mixture of an on-premises 2U appliance and a cloud-based SaaS portal. The appliance, a mixture of infrastructure and controller, is installed in the customer’s data center, and administration is done through ZeroStack’s cloud portal. Changes to the software are pushed out automatically to appliances from the cloud, and ZeroStack claims it can bring an existing OpenStack installation up to the latest revision of the product within two months of release.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

MapR Enhances its Real-Time Processing Capabilities for Big Data Analysis

MapR Logo 300x70 MapR Enhances its Real Time Processing Capabilities for Big Data AnalysisThe big data platform MapR just introduced version 5.0 of its Hadoop distribution based on version 2.7 of the open source framework designed for the processing of very large volumes of data with the support for Docker containers. MapR 5.0 also relies on the Yarn resource manager.

This version strengthens the operational capacity real-time platform. In particular, it extended the highly reliable data transport framework used in the function table MapR-DB Replication (which allows replication between multiple data centers) to provide data to external motors and synchronize in real time.

Compared to other Hadoop distributions, MapR extends the functionality of the framework on security aspects (data protection, user authentication, disaster recovery), but also high availability and performance. Version 5.0 brings further improvements in governance, with a full audit access to data through JSON and Apache Drill Views of support for secure access to data analyze.

More and more companies deploy multiple applications on the same Hadoop cluster. In this context, the latest MapR manages automated synchronization of storage, databases and search index.

To facilitate the deployment of Hadoop clusters, the publisher has also included new models of self-provisioning to set up a cluster as if it were an appliance without using specific hardware. These models can be deployed using the MapR installer. Among the possible configurations, there are the Lake Data services, data mining (Interactive SQL with Apache Drill) and analysis of operational data (basic and MapR NoSQL-DB).

The Apache project will help in the analysis and the use of batch processes and their pipelines with rapid and extensive calculations. The announced distribution automatically synced storage, databases and search indices to allow complex real-time applications. It also has new auditing capabilities.

MapR Technologies intends to continue its growth in big data and analytics-segment. In the context of the MapR database now has the ability to the table replication to synchronize data in real time and make it available for external calculators. The first case that is based on Lucene search platform Elasticsearch is supported to enable synchronized full-text search indexes automatically.

Last year, MapR and Apache Spark integrated their technologies to offer its users an all-around the clock support for Spark to develop the solution and related projects at a faster rate and to integrate more innovative changes. In addition, the two companies are working together on a rapid development of the software and other complementary innovative new features. This will pay off for MapR customers and the Hadoop community well over the coming years.

Recently, Oracle released a new software product that is designed to help big data demands. This product called Oracle Big Data Spatial and Graph provides new analytical capabilities for Hadoop and NoSQL. Oracle created the product so that it can process data natively on Hadoop and parallel on MapReduce using structures in memory.


CloudTimes

Seattle vs. San Francisco: Who is tops in the cloud?

In football, city livability rankings — and now in the cloud — San Francisco and Seattle are shaping up as fierce rivals.

Who’s winning? Seattle, for now. It’s due mostly to the great work, vision and huge head-start of Amazon and Microsoft, the two top dogs in the fast-growing and increasingly vital cloud infrastructure services market. Cloud infrastructure services, also called IaaS, for Infrastructure as a Service, is that unique segment of the cloud market that enables dreamers, start-ups and established companies to roll-out innovative new applications and reach customers anytime, anywhere, from nearly any device.

Amazon Web Services (AWS) holds a commanding 29 percent share of the market. Microsoft (Azure), is second, with 10 percent. Silicon Valley’s Google remains well behind, as does San Francisco-based Salesforce (not shown in the graph below).

cloud leaders

The Emerald city shines

I spoke with Tim Porter, a managing director for Seattle-based Madrona Venture Group. Porter told me that “Seattle has clearly emerged as the cloud computing capital.  Beyond the obvious influence of AWS and strong No. 2, (Microsoft) Azure, Seattle has also been the destination of choice for other large players to set up their cloud engineering offices.  We’ve seen this from companies like Oracle, Hewlett-Packard, Apple and others.”

Seattle is also home to industry leaders ConcurChef, and Socrata, all of whom can only exist thanks to the cloud, and to 2nd Watch, which exists to help businesses successfully transition to the cloud. Google and Dropbox have also set up operations in the Emerald City to take advantage of the region’s cloud expertise. Not surprisingly, the New York Times said “Seattle has quickly become the center of the most intensive engineering in cloud computing.”

Seattle has another weapon at its disposal, one too quickly dismissed in the Bay Area: stability. Washington has tougher non-compete clauses than California, preventing some budding entrepreneurs from leaving the mother ship to start their own company. The consequence of such laws can lead to larger, more stable businesses, with the same employees interfacing with customers over many years. In the cloud, dependability is key to customers, many of whom are still hesitant to move all their operations off-premise.

Job hopping is also less of an issue. Jeff Ferry, who monitors enterprise cloud companies for the Daily Cloud, told me that while “Silicon Valley is great at taking a single idea and turning it into a really successful company, Seattle is better for building really big companies.”

The reason for this, he said, is that there are simply more jobs for skilled programmers and computing professionals in the Bay Area, making it easier to hop from job to job, place to place. This go-go environment may help grow Silicon Valley’s tech ecosystem, but it’s not necessarily the best environment for those hoping to create a scalable, sustainable cloud business. As Ferry says, “running a cloud involves a lot of painstaking detail.” This requires expertise, experience, and stability.

San Francisco (and Silicon Valley)

The battle is far from over. The San Francisco Bay Area has a sizable cloud presence, and it’s growing. Cisco and HP are tops in public and private cloud infrastructure. Rising star Box, which provides cloud-based storage and collaboration tools, started in the Seattle area but now has its corporate office in Silicon Valley. E-commerce giant Alibaba, which just so happens to operate the largest public cloud services company in China, recently announced that its first cloud computing center would be set up in Silicon Valley.

That’s just for starters.

I spoke with Byron Deeter, partner at Bessemer Venture Partners (BVP), which tracks the cloud industry. He told me that five largest “pure play” cloud companies by market cap are all in the Bay Area: Salesforce, LinkedIn, Workday, ServiceNow and NetSuite.

The Bay Area also has money. Lots of money. According to the National Venture Capital Association, nearly $ 50 billion in venture capital was invested last year. A whopping 57 percent went to California firms, with San Francisco, San Jose and Oakland garnering a rather astounding $ 24 billion. The Seattle area received only $ 1.2 billion.

venture capital by region

The Bay Area’s confluence of talent, rules and money will no doubt continue to foster a virtuous and self-sustaining ecosystem, one that encourages well-compensated employees to leave the nest, start their own business, and launch the next evolution in cloud innovation. If Seattle has big and focused, San Francisco has many and iterative.

The cloudy forecast

Admittedly, this isn’t sports. There’s no clock to run out and not everyone keeps score exactly the same. Just try to pin down Microsoft’s Azure revenues, for example. It’s also worth noting that the two regions do not compete on an even playing field. Washington has no personal or corporate income tax, and that is no doubt appealing to many — along with the mercifully lower price of real estate, both home and office.

The cloud powers healthcare, finance, retail, entertainment, our digital lives. It is increasingly vital to our always-on, from anywhere-economy, and a key driver of technical and business model innovation. If software is eating the world, the cloud is where it all goes to get digested. Here’s hoping both cities keep winning.

Seattle vs. San Francisco: Who is tops in the cloud? originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

The 15 biggest enterprise ‘unicorns’

Yester-year there were only a few unicorns in the world of startups.

This week though, the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones VenturSource identified 115 companies with valuations north of $ 1 billion, which are referred to as unicorns.

Below are 15 of the highest valued enterprise software companies that have received venture funding but have not yet been sold or gone public.

+ MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: 12 Hot application container startups | 9 Hot enterprise storage companies to watch +

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Ashley Madison — Can it possibly get any worse? (tl;dr: YES)

The Ashley Madison hack continues to make headlines. Naturally, that’s because the news keeps getting worse.

Worse for website owners Avid Media Group. But worse for the real victims, more importantly — the people named in the hacked data dump.

Prurient interest notwithstanding, there’s still plenty to say about this uncomfortable event. And no shortage of intelligent commentators to say it. (And then there’s John McAfee.)

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers furiously smh.

curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Intel to pilot cloud technology for sharing personalized cancer treatment

At 19, Eric Dishman began a fight with kidney cancer, and for 23 years he endured what he described as Russian roulette chemotherapy.

It wasn’t until he had his DNA sequenced that doctors were able to administer a personalized treatment that placed Dishman’s cancer into remission.

The problem is, even after his genome was uncovered, it took physicians seven months to come up with a treatment — a period of time when Dishman said he was on “death’s door.”

Intel and the Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) this week launched a pilot network that will allow healthcare facilities to securely share genomic data for tailoring cancer research and personalized medicine.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Can cloud collaboration and data analytics cure cancer?

Intel, which is one of my oldest clients, recently held its developer forum. This year’s event was particularly well-done, but one thing stood out for me. It was a small part of their Internet of Things (IoT) session and it focused on data analytics and curing cancer.

Cancer is one of those topics that I’m surprised we don’t talk more about given half of the men and a third of the women will experience it in their lifetimes, and two people with the same kind of cancer and the same treatment can have dramatically different outcomes. One may live and the other may die largely because the treatment wasn’t matched to their unique genetic makeup. Cancer has killed a relatively large number of people I grew up with both in and outside of my family and, frankly, the disease scares the hell out of me.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Mother Nature teaches Google a lesson

Four successive lightning strikes on a local utility grid in Europe caused a data loss at Google’s Belgium data center. For Google, a company with a self-described “appetite for accuracy” in its data center operations, admitting an unrecoverable data loss as small as 0.000001% — as it did — likely came with a little bit of pain.

The lightning strikes occurred Aug. 13 and the resulting storage system problems weren’t fully resolved for five days. Google’s post mortem found room for improvement in both hardware upgrades and in the engineering response to the problem.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

SEC CIO leads efforts to move agency to the cloud

Pamela Dyson is shepherding a determined, if incremental, effort to move her agency’s applications to the cloud.

Dyson was named the CIO at the Securities and Exchange Commission in February, after having joined the agency in 2010, when she joined an ambitious initiative to modernize and improve efficiencies in the SEC’s IT infrastructure.

Dyson shared her thoughts on the cloud-enabled Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model during a recent presentation hosted by Federal Computer Week, explaining that the SEC’s Office of Information Technology holds out four overarching IT priorities: modernizing its aging infrastructure, improving business agility, harnessing big data and analytics, and what Dyson calls digital transformation — updating applications and access to better serve end users.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Google-Alphabet may signal an end to the cloud price wars

Google boldly goes where no tech giant has gone before. The company’s stunning restructuring from Google to Alphabet signals a profound transformation in how the company will operate. The Alphabet structure should enable Google to continue growing its core ad business (which gushes cash) and provide multiple paths for top talent to run their own businesses. It’ll also allow the very smart, very rich Larry Page and Sergey Brin to finally have the focus they want to uncover new ways of impacting the world using data, movement, biology, and the electrical signals that now seem to link everything and everyone.

But what does it mean for Silicon Valley’s startup scene? In the short term, probably an end to the artificially low-priced cloud services Google has been pushing.

Buying marketshare

Google is one of the leaders in IaaS — infrastructure as a service — though it lags behind Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft (Azure) and IBM. It’s Google, however, that has repeatedly shown a willingness to cut prices significantly to grow marketshare.

Will this continue?

For now, that’s hard to say, but it seems unlikely. At least, price cuts in excess of actual reductions in cost due to scale and Moore’s Law seem unlikely.

IaaS services are where a third-party provider, such as Google Cloud or Microsoft Azure, hosts the critical network infrastructure — the hardware, software, data storage and other elements — that allows companies to cost-effectively run their operations, test out new applications, and scale their business instantly. IaaS provides data storage, data backup, test environments, security, user management, and provides guaranteed uptime. These are all critical. Even large companies are transitioning their work away from on-premise servers and infrastructure and onto the cloud. For startups, IaaS is a must. They pay only for what they need. There is very little capital or upfront cost required, yet they can leverage the expertise, resources, and scale of a giant cloud provider. Build it, test it, unleash it onto the world. IaaS makes this possible.

According to Synergy Research Group, which tracks the IaaS market, AWS, Microsoft, IBM and Google “control well over half of the worldwide cloud infrastructure service market.” Their combined share is 54 percent — and it’s growing.

 cloud leaders

It’s Google’s marketshare, however, that’s growing faster than everyone else except Microsoft — which has made growing its cloud business a strategic focus. Indeed, before being named CEO, Satya Nadella ran Microsoft’s Azure business. A big reason for Google’s growth is undercutting the competition, which has proven particularly attractive to start-ups and small businesses.

CIS_Q414_final

John Dinsdale, Chief Analyst and Research Director at Synergy Research Group, told me that Google “absolutely” uses price cuts as a tool to garner marketshare from AWS and Microsoft. If the price cuts stop, no doubt the competition will gladly follow suit.

Building a better cloud

While the end of artificial price cuts may harm start-ups who have long benefitted from an IaaS cloud price war, it may also mean that ultimately everyone else gets a better product.

As Synergy’s Dinsdale told me, Google Cloud “is a high-growth business that has some decent scale to it, which sets it apart from a lot of the exploratory and highly speculative efforts that Google has been pushing.”

With Page and Brin now more focused on the big picture stuff, Google CEO Sundar Pichai could give the Google Cloud business the technical and business focus it demands — and which the market desires.

This sentiment was echoed by Jeff Ferry, analyst and founder of DailyCloud, a business site focused on the enterprise cloud market. Ferry told me that Google’s “cloud business has suffered from not being as glamorous as some of the moonshot projects.” Under this new structure, however, Ferry thinks that the Google leadership can focus on turning the “enterprise cloud business into a more important new opportunity.”

Ferry says that when it comes to the cloud, it’s less about “think big” because businesses that rely upon the service want to deal with someone fully focused on their unique needs and challenges. “They may admire technological geniuses,” he says, but they don’t buy from them.”

Transparency is good

In the official announcement, Larry Page said that “our company is operating well today, but we think we can make it cleaner and more accountable,” and that he intends to “improve the transparency and oversight of what we’re doing.”

By making Google — the Google we know and use — one of six separate entities, and pledging greater transparency and accountability, Page may have signaled the end of Google using money to build IaaS marketshare. Instead, these monies will likely go toward the many moonshots and experiments on the Alphabet side of the ledger. This is not necessarily a bad thing, not for Google, not for the market, not for cloud innovation. IaaS may be boring, and it’s no moonshot, but it is vital to our increasingly digital lives and to nearly every business. Building Google Cloud through innovation, not price cuts, may itself prove transformative.

Note: I asked Google for comment on how the restructuring might impact IaaS efforts. They told me that at this time they aren’t providing additional commentary beyond the official statement. 

Google-Alphabet may signal an end to the cloud price wars originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

Google cloud ”loses” data (sky falling; film at 11)

Google is sorry to report it’s lost some cloud customers’ data. Lightning struck four times near its St. Ghislain, Belgium data center, causing some Google Compute Engine (GCE) storage to go bye-bye, without sufficient battery backup to commit.

Cue the usual cast of characters who’d never trust cloud computing. Ever.

The GCE europe-west1-b zone Persistent Disk service is what’s affected, but Google claims the amount of data lost is minuscule.

In IT Blogwatch, bloggers test their backups.

curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

How Vonage is dialing up big money by pivoting to enterprise

Remember Vonage?

It was once the future. Cheap “landline” calls from home, only over the Internet. Don’t laugh. That was less than 10 years ago. Now for the surprise. Vonage is still around and it’s stock this year is way up — all thanks to a savvy pivot away from the consumer market and a timely embrace of the enterprise.

Vonage made an IPO in 2006, a year before the iPhone debuted. It was the beneficiary of wall-to-wall financial media coverage, with most of that coverage certain that this thing called “VoIP” (voice over IP) was going to remake the consumer communications market. The mad rush to IPO led to an inevitable backlash. CNBC’s Jim Cramer branded the new stock a “dog.” The company was sued by Verizon for patent infringement, then sued by investors when the IPO price quickly went south, then investigated by the feds for rumored short-selling misdeeds.

That was the small stuff. The bigger problem for Vonage was that its service, aggressively marketed to consumers, relied on routing calls via the Internet — over pipes the company did not own. This meant the owners of those pipes — Verizon, for example, or Comcast — could offer a similar service with lower costs and on the same bill as the customer’s Internet or cable TV package.

Vonage fought against this in large part through relentless advertising. Marketing could not stop the pace of technology, however. iPhone, Android, the rise of Skype, low-cost global messaging apps, all put relentless pressure on the margins of voice calls, which in turn placed relentless pressure on Vonage, chipping away at its very reason for existence. The many rumors of Vonage shopping for a buyer surprised no one. What is a surprise, however, is that Vonage has successfully embraced the latest communications craze.

It’s called Unified Communications (UC) — or Unified Communications as a Service (UCaaS) — and it’s a growing, multi-billion dollar market. UC includes not only voice service, but messaging, presence, video chat, and web collaboration. It is extremely important to businesses of all sizes.

The goal of unified communications is three-fold:

  1. Reduce total communications costs
  2. Enable robust, seamless communications across desktop phone, smartphone, the PC and the web
  3. Leverage these communication types to improve productivity and collaboration between staff, partners and customers

Oh, and UC must do these almost entirely over the cloud and with the same quality as traditional landlines or PBX, (and without a loss of uptime). Plus, UC should make it way easier for a business customer to change their service, to quickly add a new employee, or to bring a new office or franchise online. This is not a simple undertaking.

Businesses are not going to select their communications service provider based on the claims of a late-night commercial, and certainly won’t entrust such a critical need to a company with no control over its platform.

Not surprising, Vonage has succeeded in its shift to enterprise unified communications primarily through acquisition.

Last November, Vonage spent $ 114 million, mostly cash, to acquire Telesphere, an early player in unified communications. Telesphere offered business phone service, multi-point videoconferencing, mobile office solutions and, most importantly, its own nationwide cloud platform.

Vonage wasn’t finished. This past April, Vonage acquired Simple Signal, another unified communications provider, for $ 25 million. Whereas Telesphere focused on medium and large-sized businesses, Simple Signal focused primarily on smaller businesses.

But, wait. This is Vonage. What makes them think they can succeed in the business-focused unified communications space — beyond using their available cash to buy up existing companies? CEO Alan Masarek offered me a ready response via email, which I confess did mitigate some of my original skepticism.

“Our consumer business provides substantial and predictable cash flow.” This allows Vonage, Masarek said, “to reinvest in organic and inorganic growth.” He also stated that the Vonage consumer-side business drives brand awareness even in the business market — something his competitors do not have. Though he did not provide figures, Masarek said that the scale of Vonage’s consumer business, helps drive down operating costs.

For now, these efforts appear to be paying off. Vonage’s Q1 2015 revenues of $ 220 million were flat, though the business segment was up 49 percent year-over-year, to $ 42 million. As of the second quarter, business revenues are now more than 25 percent of total revenues. According to a Vonage spokesperson, Vonage’s 118 percent revenue growth leads the industry. Even better for shareholders, Vonage’s stock is up 85 percent since the company shifted to unified communications.

The goal now is to drive organic growth on the business side — not just buy customers. Shortly after the Simple Signal acquisition, Vonage brought in Ted Gilvar to oversee marketing. Gilvar’s mission is to promote the Vonage brand in the B2B space, particularly to small and medium-sized businesses. The company has just launched its “Business of Better” campaign, and is hopeful of a turnaround. At the very least, Vonage has managed to go from laughable to a company worth keeping an eye on.

How Vonage is dialing up big money by pivoting to enterprise originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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SAP HANA Dresses for Internet of Things and Predictive Analytics

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Mozilla tests a true stealth mode for Firefox

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