Rank Name CPURAMSpaceBandwidthPrice Rating Info
VEXXHOST41024 MB40 GB100 GB$31.90Review

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SingleHop11024 MB25 GB3 TB$50.00Review

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NetDepot11 GB30 GB2 TB$43.00Review

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Atlantic.Net11024 MB80 GB30 Mbps$43.80Review

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NetHosting.com11024 MB40 GB250 GB$79.95Review

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Eleven2.com0.251024 MB60 GB500 GB$25.00Review

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VEXXHOST

Info
Price $31.90
CPU 4
Space 40 GB
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 100 GB

Overview 
VEXXHOST cloud hosting company is very well known company in the field of cloud hosting services. This company was established in year 2006 and now it possesses a great experience of more than six years in this service. They are headquartered in St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada. They have also an office in United States, which is located at New York City. They have achieved the image of the most reliable and most economical service provider in very short span of time. The prices and services of this company are matchless, which is clearly depicted from customer reviews and awards from independent professional organizations. Continue reading “VEXXHOST” »

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Average

SingleHop

Info
Price $50.00
CPU 1
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 3 TB
Space 25 GB

Overview 
Singly hop cloud hosting company is one of the best companies in this domain of business. This company was established in year 2006 by two founding members Mr. Zak Boca and Dan Ushman. Its headquarters are situated in Chicago area. It has state of the art data centers in Chicago area; they are highly managed and well equipped in all respect. Single Hop Cloud hosting Company has achieved many milestones during last about six years of operation. It has achieved the recognition of being one of the reliable cloud partners of the all types of entrepreneurs. It is it number one fasted growing IT company and 25th in overall growing company in United States of America. Continue reading “SingleHop” »

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NetDepot

Info
Price $43.00
CPU 1
Space 30 GB
RAM 1 GB
Bandwidth 2 TB

Overview 
Net depot cloud hosting company is a leading small and large enterprises services provider company. It is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia in United States. This company was established about 17 years back in 1994, since then, it has gained a vast technical expertise and experience in the field of cloud hosting solutions. It has also one state of the art data center at Dallas, Texas. Continue reading “NetDepot” »

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Atlantic.Net

Info
Price $43.80
CPU 1
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 30 Mbps
Space 80 GB

Overview
Atlantic Cloud Hosting Company was established in year 1994 to provide the cloud hosting service to its customers. Since then, it has transformed itself into a market leading company in the field of cloud hosting. It provides not only the cloud hosting services but a complete solution to cloud hosting problems of a customer. It headquarters are located in Orland, Florida, United States of America. It has many other offices nationwide too. It is one of the best clouds hosting solution provider companies in USA. Continue reading “Atlantic.Net” »

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NetHosting.com

Info
Price $79.95
RAM 1024 MB
Space 40 GB
Bandwidth 250 GB
CPU 1

Overview 
Net Hosting is cloud hosting company, which is providing many services to its valuable customers. It is located in North America with headquarter in Orem, Utah, United States of America. This company was established in year 1998. Net Hosting Company was established by Lane Livingston. This company offers many other services other than cloud hosting services too. Continue reading “NetHosting.com” »

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Eleven2.com

Info
Price $25.00
RAM 1024 MB
Space 60 GB
Bandwidth 500 GB
CPU 0.25

Overview
Eleven 2 is a very well known and fast growing cloud hosting company. It was founded by Rodney in year 2003. He is a technical expert entrepreneur who established this cloud hosting company, whose headquarter is located at Houston, Texas, United States of America. This company has multiple plans and business scenarios for its customers and cloud hosting plans are among such exciting business plans of this company. It provides some unmatched cloud hosting plans in the market place. Continue reading “Eleven2.com” »

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IBM aims new IoT community site at developers

Hoping to rally the worldwide development community around the Internet of things and drive business to its cloud services as well, IBM has launched a community space for programmers to write software to connect remote devices to back-end cloud systems.

The site, called DeveloperWorks Recipes, provides a base for developers to learn about how IoT systems work and how to create code to run these systems.

This is the second community site that IBM has set up in the past month. Last week, the company established DeveloperWorks Open, to help developers collaborate on building open source business software.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: Management in the application-centric cloud

In June, the Linux Foundation started a project based on Kubernetes, which was developed by Google to manage its complex environment. Companies like Google, eBay, Jive, Facebook, and Lithium have moved to this environment.

The application-centric cloud is a complete change from the approach of having a single platform deal with an application, and it’s a revolution for the application to adapt to the hardware. It abstracts everything away from the application, such as resources and operational considerations, so the application developer need not worry about the environment that the application will run in because it’s in a container that is abstracted from the hardware.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Airbnb open sources SQL tool built on Facebook’s Presto database

Apartment-sharing startup Airbnb has open sourced a tool called Airpal that the company built to give more of its employees access to the data they need for their jobs. Airpal is built atop the Presto SQL engine that Facebook created in order to speed access to data stored in Hadoop.

Airbnb built Airpal about a year ago so that employees across divisions and roles could get fast access to data rather than having to wait for a data analyst or data scientist to run a query for them. According to product manager James Mayfield, it’s designed to make it easier for novices to write SQL queries by giving them access to a visual interface, previews of the data they’re accessing, and the ability to share and reuse queries.

It sounds a little like the types of tools we often hear about inside data-driven companies like Facebook, as well as the new SQL platform from a startup called Mode.

At this point, Mayfield said, “Over a third of all the people working at Airbnb have issued a query through Airpal.” He added, “The learning curve for SQL doesn’t have to be that high.”

He shared the example of folks at Airbnb tasked with determining the effectiveness of the automated emails the company sends out when someone books a room, resets a password or takes any of a number of other actions. Data scientists used to have to dive into Hive — the SQL-like data warehouse framework for Hadoop that Facebook open sourced in 2008 — to answer that type of question, which meant slow turnaround times because of human and technological factors. Now, lots of employees can access that same data via Airpal in just minutes, he said.

The Airpal user interface.

The Airpal user interface.

As cool as Airpal might be for Airbnb users, though, it really owes its existence to Presto. Back when everyone was using Hive for data analysis inside Hadoop — it was and continues to be widely used within web companies — only 10 to 15 people within Airbnb understood the data and could write queries using its somewhat complicated version of SQL. Because Hive is based on MapReduce, the batch-processing engine most commonly associated with Hadoop, Hive is also slow (although new improvements have increased its speed drastically).

Airbnb also used Amazon‘s Redshift cloud data warehouse for a while, said software engineer Andy Kramolisch, and while it was fast, it wasn’t as user-friendly as the company would have liked. It also required replicating data from Hive, meaning more work for Airbnb and more data for the company to manage. (If you want to hear more about all this Hadoop and big data stuff from leaders at Google, Cloudera and elsewhere, come to our Structure Data conference March 18-19 in New York.)

A couple years ago, Facebook created and then open sourced Presto as a means to solve Hive’s speed problems. It still accesses data from Hive, but is designed to deliver results at interactive speeds rather than in minutes or, depending on the query, much longer. It also uses standard ANSI SQL, which Kramolisch said is easier to learn than the Hive Query Language and its “lots of hidden gotchas.”

Still, Mayfield noted, it’s not as if everyone inside Airbnb, or any company, is going to be running SQL queries using Airpal — no matter how easy the tooling gets. In those cases, he said, the company tries to provide dashboards, visualizations and other tools to help employees make sense of the data they need to understand.

“I think it would be rad if the CEO was writing SQL queries,” he said, “but …”

Airbnb open sources SQL tool built on Facebook’s Presto database originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

IBM launches its data warehouse service into the cloud

Jumping into an increasingly competitive market, IBM has launched a cloud-based data warehouse service, which the company says offers a way for enterprises to analyze their operations while bypassing most of the headaches that come with running such a system in-house.

“You used to have to go through a number of steps to get to the data. That is changing. People now want immediate access to the data,” said Derek Schoettle, IBM general manager for cloud data services.

Available on the IBM Bluemix portal of platform services, the IBM DashDB Enterprise MPP (massive parallel processing) offers a fully managed data warehouse, potentially saving organizations the costs and hassles with setting up one in house.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

How to find agility in the cloud

When Girish Juneja left his position as CTO of the Datacenter Software division at Intel to take on the role of CTO of global financial services and business services company Altisource in January 2014, Altisource was struggling with a problem many companies would love to have — it was growing so fast that IT operations was having trouble keeping up.

“As I came in, and especially over the course of the last year, Altisource has been going through a major transition,” Juneja says. “Our customers in the mortgage space are becoming heavily regulated. They want processes to be more conformant with the regulations they’re facing now. That’s led to a lot of turn and churn within the organization.”

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CIO Cloud Computing

Amazon posts a profit as AWS sales nearly double

Cloud services continue to grow by leaps and bounds for Amazon.com.

The company reported that Amazon Web Services generated $ 1.8 billion in sales in the second quarter, up about 80 percent from the $ 1 billion it brought in a year earlier.

That helped Amazon achieve a profit of $ 92 million, a turnaround from its loss of $ 126 million in last year’s second quarter.

Overall revenue grew by 20 percent, reaching $ 23.18 billion.

Amazon offers an increasingly broad range of products and services, including an e-commerce site, video streaming, cloud computing, ebook readers, tablets and phones.

The company continues to briskly roll out new online services. During this last quarter, it launched Amazon Business, an e-commerce portal for businesses, as well as Amazon Mexico, a version of its e-commerce site specifically for that country. It also introduced the Amazon Echo, a voice-controlled device for ordering Amazon products or playing music and audio news.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Amazon posts a $92M profit as AWS sales nearly double

Cloud services continue to grow by leaps and bounds for Amazon.com.

The company reported that Amazon Web Services generated $ 1.8 billion in sales in the second quarter, up about 80 percent from the $ 1 billion it brought in a year earlier.

That helped Amazon achieve a profit of $ 92 million, a turnaround from its loss of $ 126 million in last year’s second quarter.

Overall revenue grew by 20 percent, reaching $ 23.18 billion.

Amazon offers an increasingly broad range of products and services, including an e-commerce site, video streaming, cloud computing, e-book readers, tablets and phones.

The company continues to briskly roll out new online services. During this last quarter, it launched Amazon Business, an e-commerce portal for businesses, as well as Amazon Mexico, a version of its e-commerce site specifically for that country. It also introduced the Amazon Echo, a voice-controlled device for ordering Amazon products or playing music and audio news.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Facebook prevails in shareholder lawsuit over IPO

An appeals court has ruled that shareholders cannot sue Facebook or Mark Zuckerberg in a case that accused the company of withholding key financial information from the public until after its IPO.

The shareholders alleged that Facebook had failed to share its projections for mobile ad sales prior to the offering, disclosing them only to analysts who then relayed the information to certain investors.

The plaintiffs complained that Facebook’s stock was “hammered” after it went public and the market learned of the lower forecasts. Facebook’s shares opened at just over US$ 42 on the Nasdaq on May 18, 2012, and fell to the low $ 30-range in the ensuing days. The stock has since risen strongly, trading at around $ 96 on Friday.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Downloading your LinkedIn contacts can now take all weekend

LinkedIn users now have to wait up to three days if they want a list of their contacts on the service.

Previously, the social networking site provided a way for users to instantly export their contacts. It was a useful feature for people looking to manage their contacts elsewhere. Under a change made Thursday, users now must make a request to download their account data. In a page describing the new process, LinkedIn says users will receive an email within 72 hours with a link to download the archive when it is ready.

A link to the instructions for the process appears in very small type on the LinkedIn export settings page. The change was reported earlier by VentureBeat.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Walmart to boost its e-commerce investment in China

China’s e-commerce market hasn’t been easy for Walmart to crack, but the U.S. shopping giant isn’t giving up. The company is investing even more in its e-commerce operations there, by taking full control of a Chinese online retailer.

On Thursday, Walmart bought up the remaining shares of Yihaodian, after previously owning 51 percent in the Chinese company. Financial details were not announced, but the move will accelerate Walmart’s online expansion in China, the U.S. retail giant said.

Walmart’s move was made possible by the Chinese government’s recent decision to open the e-commerce market to more foreign investment. Last month, a Chinese regulator removed restrictions that barred foreign investors from taking a 100 percent stake in any e-commerce operation in the country. Before that, foreign investors such as Walmart had to enter into joint ventures with local Chinese players.

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CIO Cloud Computing

The best Chromebooks you can buy right now

Chromebooks are popping up everywhere you look these days — and with all the options available, it isn’t always easy to figure out which one makes the most sense for you.

One quick glance through the choices is enough to make anyone’s head spin. We’ve got Chromebooks ranging from $ 149 to $ 1299, with a seemingly endless array of styles, materials, and tough-to-decipher setups (processors, pixels, and RAM — oh my!).

So let’s make things easy, shall we? I’ve used and lived with all the significant Chrome OS devices over the past several months (and years!). With that perspective in mind, these are the Chromebooks I’d recommend right now.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Computerworld Cloud Computing

Microsoft queues up DocumentDB for broad availability

Microsoft continues to fill in the check boxes for its Azure cloud. Example: Azure DocumentDB, Microsoft’s take on NoSQL databases a la Couch or MongoDB, will be generally available April 8, the company said Thursday.

The beauty of these document databases is they can ingest JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) formatted information as is — no need for the mapping process that had to occur to pump them into relational SQL databases. Amazon Web Services added JSON support to its DynamoDB database last last year.

Microsoft announced DocumentDB in August.

Microsoft, which is trying to kit out Azure as a comfy home to a wide variety of workloads, supports a variety of homegrown and third-party databases including MongoDB and Microsoft SQL Azure and Oracle.

Microsoft also said Azure Search, which works across more than 50 languages, is now available. This “search-as-a-service” targets developers who want to add full-text search into their applications.

The company also unveiled a new premium encoder for Azure Media Services.

For a primer on DocumentDB check out the video below.

[protected-iframe id=”4448a4bcd0bd8c2c93244aa57b76ff78-14960843-26974994″ info=”//channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Azure-Friday/Azure-DocumentDB-101-with-Ryan-CrawCour/player” width=”960″ height=”540″ frameborder=”0″]

Microsoft queues up DocumentDB for broad availability originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

Airbnb sharpens its focus on businesses with new software suite

More than 250 companies have signed on with Airbnbs Business Travel program since its launch a year ago, but on Monday the home-sharing service launched a new product suite in the hopes of growing that customer segment further.

Airbnb’s new software is designed to make the service easier to use for business trips, offering companies new visibility into employee travel itineraries along with financial reporting data and central billing capabilities.

A dashboard serves as the hub for Airbnb’s new offering for businesses, and it includes three main tabs. One indicates current and upcoming employee trips, including dates, locations, when they were booked, trip status, the number of people in each party and an interactive map.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Red Hat’s new operating system will power up your containers

Open-source software giant Red Hat said on Thursday that its new operating system custom made to power Linux containers is now available to download. Red Hat has been a big proponent of Docker and its container packing technology going back as far as last summer touting its support of the startup and making sure its Enterprise Linux 7 product was compatible with Docker’s technology.

Container technology has generated a lot of buzz over the past year by promising a type of virtualization that’s lighter weight than your typical virtual machine. In order for a container to actually run, it needs to be connected to a host Linux OS that can distribute the necessary system resources to that container.

While you could use a typical Linux-based OS to power up your containers, as CoreOS CEO Alex Polvi (whose own startup offers a competing container-focussed OS) told me last summer, these kinds of operating systems merely get the job done and don’t take full advantage of what containers have to offer.

Red Hat’s new OS supposedly comes packed with features designed to make running containerized applications less of a chore to manage. These features include an easier way to update the operating system (OS updates can often be a pain for IT admins) and an integration with Google’s Kubernetes container-orchestration service for spinning up and managing multiple containers.

The new OS is also promising better security for those Docker containers — which has been an issue that Docker’s team has been addressing in various updates — with a supposed stronger way of isolating containers from each other when they are dispersed in a distributed environment.

Of course, Red Hat has some competition when it comes to becoming the preferred OS of container-based applications. CoreOS has its own container-centric OS and Ubuntu has its Snappy Ubuntu Core system for powering Docker containers. Additionally, a couple of the former Cloud.com veterans who recently departed Citrix in September have started their own startup called Rancher Labs that just released RancherOS, which the startup describes as a “minimalist Linux distribution that was perfect for running Docker containers.”

It will be worth keeping an eye on which OS gains traction in the container marketplace and whether we will see some of these new operating systems starting to offer support for CoreOS’s new Rocket-container technology as opposed to just the Docker platform.

A Red Hat spokesperson wrote to me in an email that “Red Hat Enterprise Linux-based containers are not supported on CoreOS and rocket is not supported with Atomic Host. We are, as always, continuing to evaluate new additions in the world of containers, including Rocket, with respect to our customer needs.”

Red Hat’s new operating system will power up your containers originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

SAP to trim jobs and redeploy resources

Enterprise software giant SAP could cut up to 2,200 jobs (three percent of its 74,000 employees) in a move to rebalance employment around growth areas. The news was first reported by Bloomberg News.

SAP CEO Bill McDermott told Bloomberg that the company needs to put jobs where the work is.

 “If I have a great growth opportunity in Middle East and I have excess of capacity in U.S. or Germany, I am gonna offer those employees the opportunity to go to Middle East, to where customers need us … We are not eliminating jobs but lifting and shifting those assets.”

A spokesman confirmed the news but said 2,200 was the upper limit and that many affected employees could end up in other positions in the faster-growing HANA or cloud business segments. Some jobs may go away via attrition. He said the company will end the year with more employees than it started out with: “SAP is hiring.”

Still, the axe will fall for some, in what would be the second set of cutbacks since McDermott assumed the top spot at SAP in 2013. The first round of cuts came in May 2014 in a move that McDermott said would bring total headcount to 67,000 by year’s end, so clearly some hiring took place in the interim.

SAP is hardly the only enterprise IT company struggling with the new sales and cost models of the cloud computing and Software-as-a-Service world. IBM and HP have both announced layoffs and employee reassignments to try to get their cost structures in line. IBM sounded a very similar message to SAP earlier this year, confirming layoffs but also stressing that its hiring in hot areas.

Part of the problem is that IBM, HP and other older companies have relied on selling on high-end, high-margin software and hardware tied to big up-front purchases. The SaaS revolution, which spread payments out over time and offered less expensive (at least initially) products, took its toll on these players as born-to-SaaS companies like Salesforce.com started to eat their lunch.

Now, even though those SaaS companies have moved more to an enterprise sales model — requiring up-front payouts for a year or more of use — they are still seen as more cost-effective and more modern than the legacy guys.

SAP to trim jobs and redeploy resources originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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3 virtualization vendors worth watching

Microsoft and VMware both had a lot to crow about this week after Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for x86 Server Virtualization Infrastructure report gave them prominent place. Red Hat and Citrix also made showings — the former reinventing itself as a container maven and the latter as a driving force behind the technology used in Amazon’s cloud and elsewhere.

But what about the other virtualization players? Take a closer look at these three, and you’ll find each has technologies and approaches worth keeping in mind — especially as the virtualization market continues to shift away from VMs and toward containers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Why boring workloads trump intergalactic scale in HP’s cloud biz

Although having a laugh at so-called “enterprise clouds” is a respected pastime in some circles, there’s an argument to be made that they do serve a legitimate purpose. Large-scale public clouds such as Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine are cheap, easy and flexible, but a lot of companies looking to deploy applications on cloud architectures simply don’t need all of that all of the time.

So says Bill Hilf, the senior vice president of Helion (the company’s label for its cloud computing lineup) product management at HP. He came on the Structure Show podcast this week to discuss some recent changes in HP’s cloud product line and personnel, as well as where the company fits in the cloud computing ecosystem. Here are some highlights of the interview, but anyone interested in the details of HP’s cloud business and how its customers are thinking about the cloud really should listen to the whole thing.

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Amazon matters . . . and so does everything else

“First and foremost, our commitment and focus and investment in OpenStack hasn’t changed or wavered at all,” Hilf said. “It’s only increased, frankly. We are fully committed to OpenStack as our core infrastructure-as-a-service platform.” HP has been a large backer of the open source project for years now, and was building out an OpenStack-based cloud platform exclusively before acquiring Eucalyptus and its Amazon-Web-Services-compatible cloud technology in September.

However, he added, “As we started working with customers around what they were looking for in their overall cloud environment, we did hear the signal loud and clear that the AWS design pattern is incredibly relevant to them.” Often times, he explained, that means either hoping to bring an application into a private cloud from Amazon or perhaps moving an application from a private cloud into Amazon.

Hilf thinks vendors targeting enterprise customers need to make sure they’re selling enterprise what they actually want and need, rather than what’s technologically awesome. “Our approach, from their feedback, is to take an application-down approach, rather than an infrastructure-up approach,” he said. “How do we think about a cloud environment that helps an application at all parts of its lifecycle, not just giving them the ability to spin up compute instances or virtual machines as fast as possible.”

Below is our post-Eucalyptus-acquisition podcast interview with Hilf, former Eucalyptus CEO Marten Mickos and HP CTO Martin Fink.

Enterprise applications might be boring, and that’s OK

Whatever HP’s initial promises were about challenging Amazon or Microsoft in the public cloud space, that vision is all but dead. HP still maintains a public cloud, Hilf explained, bu does so as much to learn from the experience of managing OpenStack at scale as it does to make any real money from it. “It not only teaches us, but allows us to build things for people who are going to run our own [private-cloud] products at scale,” he said.

But most of the time, he said, the companies that are looking to deploy OpenStack or a private cloud aren’t super-concerned with concepts such as “webscale,” so it’s not really in HP’s financial interests to go down that path:

“[W]e don’t have an intention to go spend billions and billions of dollars to build the infrastructure required for, let’s say, an AWS or an Azure. . . . . It’s not because ‘Oh, we don’t want to write a billion-dollar check,’ it’s because [with] the types of customers we’re going after, that’s not at the top of their priority list. They’re not looking for a hundred thousand servers spread across the globe. . . . Things like security are much higher on their list than the intergalactic scale of a public cloud.”

Hilf added:

“What we typically hear day-to-day, honestly, is actually pretty unexciting and mundane from customers. They’re not all trying to stream the Olympics or to build Netflix. Like 99 percent of the enterprise in the world are doing boring things like server refreshes or their lease in a data center is expiring. It’s really boring stuff, but it matters to them.”

“If a customer came to me and said, ‘Hey I need to spin up a billion instances to do whatever,’” he said, “. . . I’d say, ‘Go talk to AWS or Azure.’”

Get over the talk about lock-in

Despite the fact that it’s pushing a lineup of Helion cloud products that’s based on the open source OpenStack technology, Hilf is remarkably realistic about the dreaded concept of vendor lock-in. Essentially, he acknowledged, HP, Amazon and everyone else building any sort of technology is going to make a management interface and experience that’s designed to work great with their particular technology, and customers are probably going to be running multiple platforms in different places.

Hilf thinks that’s a good thing and the nature of business, and it provides an opportunity for vendors (like HP, coincidentally) with tools to help companies get at least some view into what’s happening across all these different platforms.

“People often use the term ‘lock-in’ or ‘proprietary.’ I think the vendors get too wrapped up in this,” he said. “The enterprise is already through the looking glass. They all know they’re going to have some degree of lock-in, it’s just where.”

Why boring workloads trump intergalactic scale in HP’s cloud biz originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Cloud

Enterprises Migrating IT Infrastructure Investments to the Cloud – IDC Report

IDC Logo square 300x300 Enterprises Migrating IT Infrastructure Investments to the Cloud – IDC ReportThe cloud infrastructure sales increased over 25% to almost $ 6.3 billion in the first quarter 2015 as the companies are undertaking more and more workload by outsourcing their IT to the cloud.

According to the analyst firm IDC, the cloud infrastructure market segment registers second highest growth. As a logical consequence, the technologies that the basis for the cloud, such as servers, storage systems and Ethernet switches, account for 30% of expenditure in 2015, against 26.4% in 2014.

The growth of Cloud IT infrastructure continues to outperform the overall market of IT infrastructure, driven by companies’ decision to move their workloads to cloud platforms. In this context, HP maintained its position as No. 1 in the world with a 15.7 % market share, followed by Dell (11.9%), Cisco (9.3%), EMC (7.2%) NetApp (4.4%) and Lenovo (3.6%).

However, it is noteworthy that this upward trend is certainly general in the world, with the exception of areas of Eastern and Central Europe, where the cloud infrastructure sales declined over the period. IDC attributes this to the unstable political and economic climate.

The report says “end users continue to evaluate various approaches to adopting cloud-based IT: some integrate public cloud service into their IT strategies, others choose to build their own private clouds or use third-party private cloud offerings, and some, seeing benefits in both, implement hybrid cloud strategies. The breadth and width of cloud offerings only continue to grow, with an increasing universe of business- and consumer-oriented solutions being born in the cloud and served better by the cloud. This growing demand from the end user side and expansion of cloud-based offerings from service providers will continue to fuel growth in spending on the underlying IT infrastructure in the foreseeable future.”

Investments are growing in both public cloud and private cloud. But it is the public cloud that carves the lion’s share with two-thirds of the cloud infrastructure expenditures dedicated to them. While sales of private cloud rose 24.4% to $ 4.2 billion, those of public cloud have evolved similarly, a 25.5% increase to $ 3.9 billion.

The report further noted that “Cloud IT infrastructure growth continues to outpace the growth of the overall IT infrastructure market, driven by the transition of workloads onto cloud-based platforms. Both private and public cloud infrastructures have been growing at a similar pace, suggesting that customers are open to a broad array of hybrid deployment scenarios as they modernize their IT for the 3rd Platform, begin to deploy next-gen software solutions, and embrace modern management processes that enable agile, flexible, and extensible cloud platforms.”

In the next five years, IDC expects spending on cloud infrastructures continue to grow, and their share of total infrastructure spending should increase to 50% as companies continue to turn increasingly to the public cloud.


CloudTimes

Google opens its cloud to Microsoft workloads

Google has expanded support for Windows workloads running on its cloud, a move that the company hopes will better position its Google Cloud Platform to court enterprise customers.

Google is looking to catch up with Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure in the Infrastructure-as-a-Service market, according to researchers. Supporting Windows OSs is seen as somewhat of a table-stakes feature to attract enterprise customers. Google rolled out a preview of Windows Server OSs earlier this year, but today at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference (WPC) made the Windows virtual machine images generally available on the Google Cloud Platform.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Cloud providers fail to give IT the data it needs

Cloud users made their feelings known in new research study by Forrester: Users say vendors must do a better job of assuaging compliance fears, build more support capabilities, and make customers feel wanted.

The survey covered 275 IT decision-makers in the United States, United Kingdom, and Singapore. Among its eye-opening findings:

  • 39 percent of U.K. respondents agreed with the following statement: “My cloud provider doesn’t know me or my company.”
  • One out of three globally stated, “My provider charges me for every little question or incident.”
  • 45 percent globally agreed with the statement: “If I were a bigger customer, my cloud provider would care more about my success.”

The important information that cloud users don’t get from their providers include performance, operations, billing data, and workload profiles. Thus, cloud users risk financial or operational hits due to missing or hidden metadata. That’s why they’re crying out for cloud provides to furnish this data.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

The era of ever-cheaper cloud services is over

After years and years of competitive price cuts, Microsoft is hiking prices on its cloud computing service. IBM is also adjusting prices upward.

Last week, Aiden Finn, a Dublin-based Microsoft-focused consultant, posted excerpts from a company email alerting customers that Azure prices in the euro zone will rise 13 percent as of Aug. 1.

Over the last several years, cloud prices have dropped significantly as cloud providers sought to grab more market share. It became so routine that I stopped reporting on such price drops: Another price cut? Who cares?

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing