Rank Name CPURAMSpaceBandwidthPrice Rating Info
VEXXHOST41024 MB40 GB100 GB$31.90Review

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SingleHop11024 MB25 GB3 TB$50.00Review

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NetDepot11 GB30 GB2 TB$43.00Review

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Atlantic.Net11024 MB80 GB30 Mbps$43.80Review

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NetHosting.com11024 MB40 GB250 GB$79.95Review

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Eleven2.com0.251024 MB60 GB500 GB$25.00Review

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VEXXHOST

Info
Price $31.90
CPU 4
Space 40 GB
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 100 GB

Overview 
VEXXHOST cloud hosting company is very well known company in the field of cloud hosting services. This company was established in year 2006 and now it possesses a great experience of more than six years in this service. They are headquartered in St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada. They have also an office in United States, which is located at New York City. They have achieved the image of the most reliable and most economical service provider in very short span of time. The prices and services of this company are matchless, which is clearly depicted from customer reviews and awards from independent professional organizations. Continue reading “VEXXHOST” »

1 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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Overall
Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average

SingleHop

Info
Price $50.00
CPU 1
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 3 TB
Space 25 GB

Overview 
Singly hop cloud hosting company is one of the best companies in this domain of business. This company was established in year 2006 by two founding members Mr. Zak Boca and Dan Ushman. Its headquarters are situated in Chicago area. It has state of the art data centers in Chicago area; they are highly managed and well equipped in all respect. Single Hop Cloud hosting Company has achieved many milestones during last about six years of operation. It has achieved the recognition of being one of the reliable cloud partners of the all types of entrepreneurs. It is it number one fasted growing IT company and 25th in overall growing company in United States of America. Continue reading “SingleHop” »

0 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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Overall
Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average

NetDepot

Info
Price $43.00
CPU 1
Space 30 GB
RAM 1 GB
Bandwidth 2 TB

Overview 
Net depot cloud hosting company is a leading small and large enterprises services provider company. It is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia in United States. This company was established about 17 years back in 1994, since then, it has gained a vast technical expertise and experience in the field of cloud hosting solutions. It has also one state of the art data center at Dallas, Texas. Continue reading “NetDepot” »

0 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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Overall
Features
Price
Reliability
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Average

Atlantic.Net

Info
Price $43.80
CPU 1
RAM 1024 MB
Bandwidth 30 Mbps
Space 80 GB

Overview
Atlantic Cloud Hosting Company was established in year 1994 to provide the cloud hosting service to its customers. Since then, it has transformed itself into a market leading company in the field of cloud hosting. It provides not only the cloud hosting services but a complete solution to cloud hosting problems of a customer. It headquarters are located in Orland, Florida, United States of America. It has many other offices nationwide too. It is one of the best clouds hosting solution provider companies in USA. Continue reading “Atlantic.Net” »

0 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average

NetHosting.com

Info
Price $79.95
RAM 1024 MB
Space 40 GB
Bandwidth 250 GB
CPU 1

Overview 
Net Hosting is cloud hosting company, which is providing many services to its valuable customers. It is located in North America with headquarter in Orem, Utah, United States of America. This company was established in year 1998. Net Hosting Company was established by Lane Livingston. This company offers many other services other than cloud hosting services too. Continue reading “NetHosting.com” »

0 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

Ratings
Overall
Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average

Eleven2.com

Info
Price $25.00
RAM 1024 MB
Space 60 GB
Bandwidth 500 GB
CPU 0.25

Overview
Eleven 2 is a very well known and fast growing cloud hosting company. It was founded by Rodney in year 2003. He is a technical expert entrepreneur who established this cloud hosting company, whose headquarter is located at Houston, Texas, United States of America. This company has multiple plans and business scenarios for its customers and cloud hosting plans are among such exciting business plans of this company. It provides some unmatched cloud hosting plans in the market place. Continue reading “Eleven2.com” »

0 positive user reviews     0 negative user reviews.

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Features
Price
Reliability
Support
Average

Red Hat polishes JBoss EAP for a cloud-native future

Red Hat on Monday rolled out a major new release to its JBoss Enterprise Application Platform that’s designed to offer better support for containers and cloud-native applications.

It’s been 10 years since Red Hat acquired JBoss, but much has changed in the technology world since then. Now, JBoss EAP 7 is optimized for cloud environments, Red Hat says. The platform combines Java EE 7 APIs (application programming interfaces) with key DevOps tools including Red Hat’s JBoss Developer Studio integrated development environment (IDE). Also included are Jenkins, Arquillian, Maven, and support for several Web and JavaScript frameworks.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Here’s how NASCAR is digitizing race day

When cars leave the starting line at Sonoma Raceway in California on Sunday for the start of the Toyota/Save Mart 350, they’ll be taking part in the launch of a product designed to help NASCAR officials monitor and manage the 110-lap race.

New race management software that NASCAR is launching on Sunday is designed to give officials a single screen to watch where cars are on the racetrack, manage penalties and share information with racing teams about what’s going on.

It arose from a partnership between NASCAR and Microsoft that started in 2014. It began with a mobile inspection app that let race officials see whether cars were in compliance with all the rules about how they have to be constructed.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Microsoft: Government’s data gag order practices worse than first thought

Microsoft has significantly upped the tally of U.S. government gag orders slapped on demands for customer information, according to court documents filed last week.

In a revised complaint submitted to a Seattle federal court last Friday, Microsoft said that more than half of all government data demands were bound by a secrecy order that prevented the company from telling customers of its cloud-based services that authorities had asked it to hand over their information.

The original complaint — the first round in a lawsuit Microsoft filed in April against the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and Attorney General Loretta Lynch — had pegged the number of data demands during the past 18 months at 5,624. Of those, 2,576, or 46 percent, were tagged with secrecy orders that prevented Microsoft from telling customers it had been compelled to give up their information.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Here’s how NASCAR is digitizing race day

When cars leave the starting line at Sonoma Raceway in California on Sunday for the start of the Toyota/Save Mart 350, they’ll be taking part in the launch of a product designed to help NASCAR officials monitor and manage the 110-lap race.

New race management software that NASCAR is launching on Sunday is designed to give officials a single screen to watch where cars are on the racetrack, manage penalties and share information with racing teams about what’s going on.

It arose from a partnership between NASCAR and Microsoft that started in 2014. It began with a mobile inspection app that let race officials see whether cars were in compliance with all the rules about how they have to be constructed.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Network World Cloud Computing

Apache Libcloud provides single Python API for all clouds

The Apache Software Foundation has released the first full 1.0 release of Libcloud, a Python library designed to provide a common set of abstractions for working with services on over 30 different cloud providers — including container services and backup-as-a-service.

The premise is that a developer can use Libcloud to access and manipulate any number of clouds in their software without having to worry about the low-level details of how each cloud implements its features. Libcloud works with Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Google Compute Engine, and any OpenStack-based cloud.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Oracle will give cloud users first dibs on its next big database update

Oracle’s namesake database may have been born on-premises, but the next big update to the software will make its debut in the cloud.

Oracle Database 12c Release 2, also known as Oracle Database 12.2, is slated for release in the second half of this year. It will first be made available in the cloud, with an on-premises version arriving at some undefined point in the future.

“We are committed to giving customers more options to move to the cloud because it helps them reduce costs and become more efficient and agile,” Oracle said. “Oracle Database 12.2 will be available in the cloud first, but we will also make it accessible to all of our customers.”

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Dropbox enhances its productivity tools across the board

Dropbox just dumped a ton of new productivity features on users of its file storage and collaboration service that are all aimed at making it easier for people to get work done within its applications. 

Updates to the Dropbox app for iOS allow users to scan documents directly into the cloud storage service, and get started with creating Microsoft Office files from that app as well. The company also increased the ease and security of sharing files through Dropbox, and made it easier to preview and comment on files shared through the service.

These launches mean that Dropbox will be more valuable to people as a productivity service, and not just a folder to hold files. It’s especially important as the company tries to capture the interest of business users, who have a wide variety of competing storage services they could subscribe to instead. 

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Adobe Creative Cloud Update Offers More Features, Performance Enhancements

In a major update announced June 20, Adobe is offering deeper integration and additional capabilities in its Creative Cloud suite, which now lets users work faster and helps foster more productive workdays.
InformationWeek: Cloud

IDG Contributor Network: Docker rolls out an orchestration engine. Because what customers want, customers get

Ever since it became obvious that Docker was onto something pretty special, there have been questions about how the company would parlay its rapidly increasing venture-backed valuation into monetization and, by extension, what that would mean for the significant ecosystem of third-party software vendors and service providers that Docker has built around its eponymously named movement.

Indeed, there have been times over the past years when Docker has made acquisitions of ecosystem players or introduced functionality as part of the platform that has been somewhat competitive to one or other members of its ecosystem. These moves had been met with a degree of concern and worry. Over time, however, the ecosystem has matured and has come to realize that Docker has no option but to extend its functional footprint, which it will do in a broadly open way. And while there will certainly be some casualties from the roster of ISVs around Docker, the approach of making its own technology “swappable” for third-party tools gives some of these players a bit of an out.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Self-driving Olli shuttle with IBM Watson debuts in Washington area

Olli, a self-driving shuttle for 12 passengers running IBM Watson Internet of Things technology, made its debut in a shopping area of the Washington suburbs on Thursday.

While some “fine-tuning” of the self-driving features are needed, passengers, by this fall, should be able to ride around and speak directions to Olli on the private roads at the National Harbor shopping and entertainment area on the Maryland side of the Potomac River, according to a spokeswoman for Local Motors, the designer of Olli.

The vision is that Olli will be used in all kinds of venues, such as crowded urban areas, college and corporate campuses and theme parks. It could also become the “last mile” connection from a subway or bus stop to a job site. Miami-Dade County has ordered two of the vehicles for a pilot project there, said the Local Motors spokeswoman, Jacqueline Keidel.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

ContainerX steps into the limelight with a new container platform for enterprises

Enterprises interested in tapping container technology now have a brand-new option for managing it: ContainerX, a multitenant container-as-a-service platform for both Linux and Windows.

Launched into beta last November by a team of engineers from Microsoft, VMware and Citrix, the service became generally available in both free and paid versions on Thursday. Promising an all-in-one platform for orchestration, compute, network, and storage management, it provides a single “pane of glass” for all of an enterprise’s containers, whether they’re running on Linux or Windows, bare metal or virtual machine, public or private cloud.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Self-driving Olli shuttle with IBM Watson debuts in Washington area

Olli, a self-driving shuttle for 12 passengers running IBM Watson Internet of Things technology, made its debut in a shopping area of the Washington suburbs on Thursday.

While some “fine-tuning” of the self-driving features are needed, passengers, by this fall, should be able to ride around and speak directions to Olli on the private roads at the National Harbor shopping and entertainment area on the Maryland side of the Potomac River, according to a spokeswoman for Local Motors, the designer of Olli.

The vision is that Olli will be used in all kinds of venues, such as crowded urban areas, college and corporate campuses and theme parks. It could also become the “last mile” connection from a subway or bus stop to a job site. Miami-Dade County has ordered two of the vehicles for a pilot project there, said the Local Motors spokeswoman, Jacqueline Keidel.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Cloud Computing

Samsung’s Joyent buy is a swipe at AWS and Microsoft Azure

The Internet of Things is as much about computing as it is about the “things” themselves, and that’s why Samsung Electronics is buying Joyent.

At first glance, a maker of smartphones, home appliances and wearables doesn’t seem like it would need a cloud computing company. But so-called smart objects rely on a lot of number-crunching behind the scenes. A connected security camera can’t handle all its video storage and image analysis by itself, for example, and that’s where cloud services come in.

The real money in IoT will be in the services more than the devices themselves, research firm Gartner says. It’s not entirely up to Samsung to deliver services its devices, but the company sees an opportunity there.

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CIO Cloud Computing

Sapho Gives Enterprise Applications A Millennial-Friendly Makeover

Logging into and performing tasks on what can be dozens of different enterprise applications can eat up a lot of an enterprise employee’s workday. A company called Sapho is looking to solve that with a “micro app” on-premises platform that delivers a unified interface of tasks to users via desktop or smartphone.
InformationWeek: Cloud

Samsung to acquire U.S. cloud services firm Joyent

Samsung Electronics is acquiring U.S. cloud services company Joyent as it builds its services business around mobile devices and the Internet of Things.

Under the deal, Joyent will operate as a standalone subsidiary and will continue providing cloud infrastructure and software services to its customers. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed.

Samsung said Thursday the acquisition would give the smartphone maker access to its own cloud platform to support it in the areas of mobile, IoT and cloud-based software and services.

The South Korean company said it had evaluated a number of providers of public and private cloud infrastructure but zeroed in on Joyent in San Francisco because it saw “an experienced management team with deep domain expertise and a robust cloud technology validated by some of the largest Fortune 500 customers.”

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

IDG Contributor Network: 17 painful ways a major software purchase can go wrong

In some ways selecting enterprise software is like painting a house – the key to success lies in the preparation. Rather than doing the work demanded by a mature software selection process, some organizations take shortcuts and create unnecessary pain for themselves. By the time they realize just how much pain they are in for, contracts are signed, and it is too late to do anything about it. This article lists many of the pains caused by partial or outright software failures to help you justify the effort of doing the up-front software selection work.

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CIO Cloud Computing

WWDC recap show: The highs and lows of Apple’s 2016 WWDC keynote

Apple unveiled major updates to all four of its operating systems: tvOS, macOS, iOS, and watchOS. Some of them are incredibly exciting, while others seem awfully familiar. Is Apple pushing software forward or playing catchup?
InfoWorld Cloud Computing

A popular cloud privacy bill stalls in the Senate

A bill to give email and other documents stored in the cloud new protections from government searches may be dead in the U.S. Senate over a proposed amendment to expand the FBI’s surveillance powers.

The Electronic Communications Privacy Act Amendments Act would require law enforcement agencies to get court-ordered warrants to search email and other data stored with third parties for longer than six months.

Under U.S. law, police need warrants to get their hands on paper files in a suspect’s home or office and on electronic files stored on his computer or in the cloud for less than 180 days. But under the 30-year-old ECPA, police agencies need only a subpoena, not reviewed by a judge, to demand files stored in the cloud or with other third-party providers for longer than 180 days.

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

Is Microsoft publishing its own FreeBSD? Yes and no

It sounds like another one for the Hell Freezes Over file: Microsoft has released a version of FreeBSD 10.3, an edition of the liberally licensed Unix-like OS.

But as with previous Microsoft dalliances in the world of open source-licensed OSes, this isn’t a case of Microsoft admitting Windows is a technological and philosophical dead end. Instead, it’s an example of Microsoft’s continued effort in strengthening Azure’s appeal as an environment to run such OSes.

Azure-ing FreeBSD

The details are simple: FreeBSD 10.3, the latest production version of the OS, is available as a download-and-go VM image in the Azure Marketplace. This image, however, has Microsoft, not FreeBSD Foundation (the organization that supports FreeBSD development) listed as the publisher.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing

Six steps to achieve an As-a-Service transformation

Although vendor-written, this contributed piece does not promote a product or service and has been edited and approved by Network World editors.

The As-a-Service model promises to reshape business service delivery to provide companies with plug-in, scalable, consumption-based services, but the opportunities are vastly untapped. According to an Accenture and HfS Research survey of more than 700 enterprise service buyers, advisors and service provider executives, seven out of 10 enterprises with over $ 10 billion in revenues do not expect their core operations to be delivered As-a-Service for at least another five years.

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Network World Cloud Computing

Farewell, Tom Perkins, the VC’s VC

Tom Perkins, co-founder of Kleiner-Perkins, has died. He was 84.

Since the early 1970s, he’d been responsible for much of the creation and growth of venture-capital in the San Francisco bay area. He essentially created Sand Hill Road and its VC industry.

Without seeking to minimize the work of Sherman Fairchild, Fred Terman, Bill Hewlett, nor Dave Packard, Silicon Valley wouldn’t be what it is without him. In IT Blogwatch, may he rest in peace.

Your humble blogwatcher curated this for your information. Not to mention: Something Ventured

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Computerworld Cloud Computing

HPE Unveils Converged IoT Systems, Partnerships

Hewlett Packard Enterprise, at its Discover 2016 event, announced a multifaceted strategy for IoT that includes converged systems at the network edge, security, analytics, and partnerships with some of the big players in IoT platforms for business.
InformationWeek: Cloud

IDG Contributor Network: Can enterprise IT seem like a good deal again?

A few weeks ago, I sat on a panel hosted by CenturyLink on sustainability and efficiency in IT. At CenturyLink’s sunny Irvine, California, data center my co-panelists gathered ahead of going on stage and on camera. One of the panelists remarked that enterprise IT was dying—dying—slowly dying. But I believe this characterization is too broadly phrased and an inaccurate choice of words.

The enterprise’s data center paradigm has changed irrevocably. And it will progress on its change cycle as enterprises embark on fewer new builds, and trends show that market share favors the commercial data center service providers. The paradigm of public cloud puts the sometimes outmoded ways of the enterprise data centers and legacy enterprise IT into an unfavorable light. But rest assured, there are some positive signs for enterprise IT—and good results ahead—but some changes do need to occur.

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Network World Cloud Computing